Metheringham Highlights

Metheringham, largely because of its age, contains some buildings of note: these are listed below.

Old Post Office

The Old Post Office

The Old Post Office

This building is reputed to be one of the oldest in Metheringham and also to have a secret tunnel running to the church!  It was built in a typical mud and stud style with bricks being inbuilt later. Mud & stud style buildings of this style were common between 1720 and 1760.  It has a steeply pitched roof that would have been thatched and Gothic style windows which were a Victorian addition.  It has lain empty for some years and it was falling into neglect. A local private buyer has purchased this delightful building and is in the process of restoration.

Metheringham Flour Mill

Metheringham Flour Mill

Metheringham Flour Mill

This is a disused brick built tower mill standing at an estimated 15.4 metres in height.  From the foot of the stone steps the mill rises up in 205 courses of brickwork.  The mill is thought to have been built in 1867 and worked until the 1930s as a flour mill.  The multi sailed brick tower mills are characteristic of Lincolnshire and the historian, Rex Wailes, is reported to have said that they were the finest tower mills ever built in England.  Metheringham is fortunate to have such a good surviving example although it sits disused in a paddock alongside the mill house with no public right of access.  The machinery is thought to be still inside.

The Old Fire Station

The Old Fire Station

The Old Fire Station

The original fire engine was stationed at Blankney Hall and was a horse drawn vehicle with a steam operated pump.  Later it was moved to a garage, now a vacant plot on Lincoln Road.  The engine was then moved to the station in Fen Road.  If it was needed, Jack Chapman of Station Road received the call and cycled to Fen Road to raise the alarm.  Today, the new modern fire station is only 50 yards away at the corner of Fen Road and the bypass.  The old station became a Pentecostal chapel and has had many uses since.

Metheringham War Memorial

Metheringham War Memorial

Metheringham War Memorial

Metheringham War Memorial is one of the finest in Lincolnshire and a splendid tribute to those men from the village who made the supreme sacrifice in two World Wars.  Following a service in St Wilfrid's parish church, the War Memorial was unveiled to a large gathering at 3:00pm on Sunday 12th December 1920 by the Marchioness of Carisbrooke, daughter of the Earl of Londesborough of nearby Blankney Hall.  It records the names of 42 soldiers who died in the Great war between 1914 and 1918. Twenty five years later, eight further names were added as a result of lives lost during the second World War.  The white Italian marble figure depicts a soldier in the uniform of the Lincolnshire Regiment with his rifle reversed and head bowed.  It stand on a polished Aberdeen granite pedestal. The site was donated by the Earl of Londesborogh and built by a local monument mason, Fredrick William Baldock, at a total cost of 600.

Metheringham Manor

Metheringham Manor
Used with permission C. Maycock

Metheringham Manor

The manor was built in the 17th Century and was initially thatched.  Built in the shape of a Greek cross, it was badly damaged by fire in the 19thCentury. The Lord of the Manor, Henry Chaplin of Blankney Hall allowed his agents to live there. On the succession of Lord Londesborough as Lord of the Manor, the well known Lancashire and England cricketer Captain R.H. Spooner was appointed agent and also lived there. The Agent at Blankney in 1904 was Henry Blamire Young.  In the photo on the left, he and his wife Phyllis, née Wimbush, are seen sitting in the garden at the Manor on 1 December 1904. The Manor House was requisitioned by the RAF in 1942 until the end of the Second World war.  It is currently the home of the Parker family who own Blankney estates.

Metheringham Railway Station

Metheringham Railway Station

Metheringham Railway Station

The station was built on the line of the Great Northern and Great eastern Railways. It opened in 1882 and was called Blankney and Metheringham The Blankney name can still be seen on the signal box to this day. Opposite the station is the entrance to Blankney Ride, once knowna as the Old Coach-Road, which Henry Chaplin had built to link the station directly to Blankney Hall.  The station was very busy in its day with passengers, goods, livestock and coal all  being carried. The Liverpool - Harwich 'Boat Train' would also pass through.  The Second World War brought the erection of reinforced 'block type' buildings to house the  control centre for this section of Eastern Railways.  The station closed in 1961 but was reopened in the mid 1970s for passenger traffic.

Metheringham Wesleyan Chapel

Parker's Stores

Parker's Stores

Parkers Store was originally an old Wesleyan chapel built between 1840 and 1880. Behind the store are the remains of the old Wesleyan day school.  School records began on 6th October 1862.

Thomson's Grocery Store

Thomson's Grocery Store

Thomson's Grocery Store

This grocery and general provision store sold all sorts of goods ranging from preparation and dispensing of drugs to haberdashery material, dried goods, confectionery and diary products. As late as 1972, when Annie Thomson finally closed the shutters in the face of supermarket competition, the inside had thick mahogany counters and pharmacy drawers labeled with the names of potions in Latin.  The old fittings were removed in the 1970s when the shop was sold and converted first to a bakery and now as a Chinese take away.