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June 3, 2009

The History of RAF Nocton Hall Hospital

For many who have lived in this area throughout their lives, they will know all there is to know about the general history of RAF Hospital, Nocton Hall. For others it will only be the knowledge that it used to be a military hospital but closed down when it was felt, by the military, to be no longer viable. Since then everyone knows of its demise over recent time.

RAF Nocton Hall Hospital
RAF Nocton Hall Hospital


Nocton Hall's first days of being a hospital came in the First World War, surprisingly under the control of the Americans. The owners of Nocton Estates at this time were the Hodgsons with the third generation of the family, Norman, the lord of the manor. Norman had taken over at the helm in 1902 on the death of his father John. He was 25 years old and had already seen action in conflict, risen to the rank of captain during the Boer War in South Africa. His passion was game shooting and during his time on the estate it is reported that an average of 10,000 game birds a year were bagged on his "shoots".

With the outbreak of the war in 1914 the many tenant farmers showed great resilience in the increase of farm produce but as the conflict progressed many of these local men went off to war, some never to return. Norman, heavily involved in his responsibilities as estate manager, set to and replaced these men with prisoners of war. Having seen action as an officer in the Boer War he became respected as a person by the POWs and it soon became apparent that the appreciated their lives here sooner than on the western front.

On the United States' entry into the war in 1917 Norman allowed the Hall to be utilised as a convalescent home for American Officers wounded in action. Norman and his family moved from their home to live in Embsay House on the edge of the village, never to return to the Hall. The tranquil setting of the Hall grounds proved a great tonic for the many young men who came and went for the next few months up to the end of action.

As stated the Hodgsons never returned to the Hall and in 1919 the estate was sold to W.H. Dennis. He had little affection for village life and he was responsible for the demise of many, if not all the tenant farmers, as one by one they were asked to vacate their properties as he set out to farm the estate himself. The Americans had also vacated the Hall in this year and for the next few years Nocton lost its homely feeling.

Come 1936 the Estate again changed hands, this time becoming the property of Smith's Potato Crisps with John Ireson becoming their land agent. It would be he and his wife who returned Nocton to a village of fun and affection.

Approaching WW2 the only Royal Air Force Hospital in the county was to be found at RAF Cranwell, having opened there in 1920. With the increase in RAF bases in the county during this conflict it was quickly established that the facility at Cranwell was not sufficient and sites were being looked at throughout the county, including Nocton Hall which had not been occupied as a private home since the Americans had left in 1919. This resulted in the Air Ministry acquiring the Hall and around 200 acres from Smith's Potato Crisps in 1940, thus severing the union of the estate from the hall for the first time in almost nineteen hundred years.

Once acquired, Nocton was turned into an RAF Hospital, but before opening it was deemed to be inadequate for the role needed. Instead the Air Ministry took possession of Rauceby Hospital near Sleaford, which had, since 1902, been used as a Victorian-style Lunatic Asylum. The inmates housed here were transferred out to other similar establishments and for the remainder of the war, until 1947 when the National Health Service came into being, these premises became known as No 4 RAF Hospital Rauceby run by medical staff, transferred from RAF Cranwell. The main role of this, 1,000 bed hospital, was as a Crash and Burns Unit with the full back up of operating theatres and plastics units for the many pilots injured.

The similarly, newly formed RAF Hospital Nocton Hall, did not stand empty and was leased out to the Americans for a second occasion in history and used as an army clearing station. Their Army Medical Branch built a complex to the east of the Hall, which became so well known to all in the locality, and was called the US Army 7th General Hospital. The Hall in all its splendour was used as an Officers' Club.

At the end of the War the Americans again left Nocton as the Royal Air Force chose it as their permanent military hospital for Lincolnshire. The existing accommodation was not felt suitable for a General Hospital and a building programme commenced in 1946 with the first stage, which saw four new wards, opened a year later and the first patient admitted on 1 November 1947. The Hall was used as the living quarters for the female officers of the RAF Medical staff while married quarters were built on adjacent land (now private homes as part of the present Nocton Park).

The "programme" continued as the years passed and by 1954 the hospital provided fully staffed medical, surgical, ear, nose, throat, opthalmic and dental facilities. This "new" local amenity, not only became a facility for the service personnel and their families from Lincolnshire, but also for local residents in the area. In addition it also became a great source of employment for local people, men and women alike.

Come May 1957 the Hospital opened its Maternity Wing and for the next 25 years there was to be a steady flow of babies born at Nocton Hall. In 1966 the expansion work continued with the opening of new twin operating theatres, a central sterile supply department and a neuro-psychiatric centre.

In July 1969 Nocton Hall saw the last royal to enter its grounds as Princess Alexandra visited the hospital's newly opened self contained Maternity Division. It had been 468 years since the first royal visited these grounds as Katherine Howard, the fifth wife of Henry VIII, visited in October 1541, planting a famous chestnut tree in the grounds which stands to the present day.

Through the endeavours of all, Nocton had risen in status, with its 740 beds, as the No 1 Royal Air Force Hospital in the country but then after 35 years, on the 31 March 1983, a heart wrenching decision was made to close it as a military hospital and domestic life of the area was lost for ever.

In 1984 Nocton Hall was leased to the US Armed Forces for a third time, this time as a United States Air Force wartime contingency hospital. During the Gulf War in 1991/92 some 1300 US medical staff were sent there, many billeted at RAF Scampton, north of Lincoln. Fortunately only 35 casualties received treatment here during this conflict. In its latter days just 13 American personnel remained here to keep the hospital serviceable until they too departed.

There then followed a short period when the hospital served as an RAF forward outpatient department from 1992 until 1993 but in September 1995 RAF Nocton Hall and grounds was finally handed back to the British Government. It was then bought by a private owner who turned the hall into a residential home until its eventual demise - the rest is a sad memory

71 Comments

d newton said:

I have just found your wonderful site. I did most of my national service cooking in the officers mess. A lot of local civilians were employed in those days they were lovely people.I used to go home every other weekend so I did'nt get to know the area all that well.From the map I see mess is still standing
Thanks again Doug Newton

5077803 AC1 Hotson E said:

I served at Nocton from 1960 to 1962 on Ward 7 and Ward 5. Group Captain Sidey was Station Commander. Group Captain Knipe was one of the Surgeons. Some of the Sisters were Williams, Pacival and Glover.
My mates were Aberdeeen Bob Leiper, Cuzz Mick Crossley, Bob Croft, Shaggy Bill Dunnet. I played Double Bass for The Bob Paterson Trio. Bob was the Camp Butcher who came from Bonnyrigg and supported Hearts. I have written my Life Story which includ some of the insidents at Nocton. If we decide to go further; then I will need help form my Family Ian and Vicky. Cheers Eric the Viking

Sue Waugh (nee warburton) said:

I trained as a nurse at Nocton Hall from 1974-1976. I am saddened to see Nocton as it is now. I remember some wonderful times, and sad times too. It would be great to hear from anyone I knew back then. I have loads of stories to share.

5077803 AC1 Hotson E said:

We will be following up with further information on Satiurtday 5th September when I get some help from my Grand Daughter Vicky.

4035922 AC1 G lilley said:

Took patiant to nocton from RAF Driffield in 1950. I was a driver.

Marilyn Triffitt (nee Smith) said:

I was at RAF Nocton Hall from 1972 to 1974 I did my SEN nurse training there and have many happy memories of the camp and friends past and present. Hence the reunion at Red Lion Dunston at the end of October 09.
Also went back in 1977 with my then hubby Harry Bowness and our 2 sons went to Dunston School Our daughter was born at the hospital in 1980. We left just as the camp was closing.
Went back this year it was so upsetting to see the Hall is such a derelict state.
Got some great pics of friends there
would love to hear from anyone from the good old days

Bruce Haines said:

I was the electrician (sparky) at Nocton 1972-75.(MDSS)
Unfortunately I couldn't make the reunion in October 2009 as I am in Queenstown NZ and busy busy busy.
Yes it's so sad seeing Nocton in its present state.
Saw it on Google Earth's time line and watched the tree's enveloping the buildings at the click of the mouse.

One web site by some one has recently walked in the derelict hospital said, "when he walked down the halls, I can feel a presence of the ghosts who now exist here.
I replied back to him, "hey I'm not dead yet, but may be later".
Would be great to catch up with friends from the good old days.


bob leiper said:

get in touch eric

b0b leiper

pamela leiper said:

anyone get in touch with pam stares pbx at nocton 1960-6o or bob leiper

Bob Leiper or Pam Leiper said:

Any PBX girls Nocton 1960-1963 - Rose,Rita,Heather etc.

Eric Hotson - please get in touch with Bob.

E-mail us at: leiperpamela@yahoo.co.uk

look forward to hearing from you - we have many phtots from Nocton!!

Bob Leiper or Pam Leiper said:

Any PBX girls Nocton 1960-1963 - Rose,Rita,Heather etc.

Eric Hotson - please get in touch with Bob.

E-mail us at: leiperpamela@yahoo.co.uk

look forward to hearing from you - we have many phtots from Nocton!!

Eric Hotson said:

Bob and Pam

I have emailed my life story 'Coblers Awls' and sent a little note remembering that you always called me Galloping Grimsby!

Hope to hear back from you soon
Eric The Viking

bob leiper said:

eric hotson e mail address to bob leiper please

Tony Llanes said:

I was at Nocton Hall as part of the 310th Contingency Hospital from Travis Air Force Base in Northern California in 1991. I was flabbergasted to find out what happened to the place!

Mike Base said:

During the summer of 1959 I was an LAC motor mechanic stationed at RAF Waddington. I caught pneumonia and was transfered to RAF Nocton Hall - cannot remember which ward - where they saved my life. Special thanks to SAC (WRAF) Nurse Brown who looked after me as I struggled to cope following a tracheotomy.

Thanks also to the maternity staff at RAF Nocton Hall, who (8 years later) delivered our son safely - if unexpectedly - when my wife was making a routine visit for a 'check up' on 5th April 1967, when I was again stationed at RAF Waddington, prior to demob.

Frank Kemp said:

I was stationed at Nocton 1975-76 before going to Wroughton hospital for my last two years of service.
what has happened to these hospitals since they were closed is scandalous. Wroughton doesn't exist now and from what people have said I doubt if Nocton exists either. Have very happy memories of both hospitals

John Walker said:

I Served at nocton hall from DEcember 1964 to March 1966.
I was in charge of the fire service which consisted of a cpl and 4 sac,s with a bedford fire truck to cover the hospital and the married qtrs.
I have many happy memories of nocton and all the perment staff that worked there including Chippy Horton the carpenter and his dog 'dominoe'
My future wife worked in the Bell and Steelyard pub in metherham and the hall was a lovley place for the female officer nurses, what a shame it has burnt down.

Jean Mulholland nee Todd said:

I was stationed at nocton hall 1960 1961 before going to steamer point,I was on the maternity wards post and anti,they were great times and I loved the place,so sorry to read what has happened to it.

Liz Hall nee Hayward said:

I was posted to Nocton Hall July 1979 after passing SEN training at WROUGHTON . Loved it there had great time and good friends. Was later posted to West Drayton. Really saddened to see ALL the places and postings I had gone. Nocton Hall was so beautiful too. I hope they caught the vandals and prosecuted.

Liz Hall said:

BTW, does anybody remember "Mr Pickles, from Branston"?????

John McIntyre (Nee Dick) said:

I arrived at RAF (H) Nocton Hall on 27th December 1961 straight from Boy Entrant training as a N/Att and stayed there until May 1965 when I was posted to HQ AIRCENT (Fontainebleu, France). I have some very happy memories of working on Ward 6 with Sister 'Granny' Kingston and Sister McPhail on Ward 4. I can still remember the farewell party for the last National Serviceman to leave Nocton Hall. I also worked on Ward 3, 5 & 12, O/P Dept, ECG Dept, CSSD and did a short spell in theatre. Spent many times on Fire Piquet and got up to many things including setting fire to the Fire Piquet billet roof.
It is so sad to see the state of the site now. I was there about a year ago and the security gates were open so took the opportunity to drive in and look round. If anyone has access to an aerial photo of the hospital as it was I would be interested to see it.

Chris said:

I had my wisdom teeth removed here in 1978; went back today (25 Mar 10). Dear me, what a mess. How sad to see the remains, but it brought back the memories of those days long gone.

michael smith said:

Hello

I am an entrant in a national "treasure hunt" type event and am trying to locate a plaue, sign or other memorial to the "Guinea Pig Club - South Raceby" which must be somewhere near the old WW2 hospital site.

Has anyone got any ideas where it may have been/ is now?

thanks

Bruce Haines said:

I suppose when all the WW2 bases closed down after the war, many service people felt the same as the ex RAF Nocton service people do now.
But then again, Nocton was quite special.



David Baxter said:

I was born at nocton hall.10th october 1967.I dont think my parents were stationed there,but somewhere near by.such a shame to see it in disrepair gutted...
dave

Simon Bradley said:

I was born at RAF Nocton hospital and is a shame to see the state of the site now. My grandad worked there many years ago and his name was Joseph Horton (Chippy Horton) and took his dog there "dominoe", well it was my Mums dog really! He spoke of happy times working there.

Simon

Claire Beeby said:

I was born at RAF Nocton hospital in July 1973, on my Mum's (Sandra Bradley's) 27th birthday! My grandad, Joe Horton (aka Chippy Horton) was a carpenter at the hospital. It was lovely hear that someone remembered my Grandad and his dog 'Dominoe'! Such a shame the hospital closed down.

Jacky Reid said:

My daughter Amy Samantha was the last baby to born at Nocton in December 1982. I have lovely memories of the place and was treated like a queen. Nurses and doctors were fantastic. I went back to see the place and it was so derelict. Such a shame to have let it go like that. Will always have fond memories.

Eddie Keogh said:

I was a civvy patient there as a teenager in 1960. The nursing staff were wonderful, but Surgeons Rounds took a bit of getting used to. We were expected to "Sit up to attention" if able, whilst the great panjandrum, duty surgeon, swept by. Tricky, when hooked up to tubes and wires! Still, sad to see it so derelict now.

Colin Marshall said:

I was a patient at Nocton from Jan-July '78. on ward 5 and although seriously ill found the place beautiful and the fellow patients and staff friendly and kind. The list of names is too long to relate but there were some wonderful people there. Although my reason for being there effectively saw the end of my RAF career there was some good, as my brother met his wife - one of my nurses there, when visiting me.

I tried to visit a few years ago but the place was fenced off, so I never got around but even by then it was derelict although the fire in the hall had not happened. Its so sad to think of such a beautiful place being allowed to go to ruin.

John Baxandall said:

I was an obstetrician at Nocton Hall from 1956 to 1962 and have many fond memories - Group Captain Pimblett, granny Grearson, Lucey Wainwright, David Moore, Joan Metcalf, Angela Powell and many many more. Those were happy days and it is sad for me to see the pictures of the site today. At one time an extension was built to the Hall and my next door neighbour, Fl Lt Goff, returfed his lawn from the site. He was the accountant officer. Tojo was the station Warrant Officer. Nocton Hall was very special, not only to me but to hundreds of other people who either served there or received treatment as a service person or civilian.

Geoff Whitehead said:

Stationed at Nocton 1970-71 prior to posting to RAFH Akrotiri, where I believe John Baxendall was posted. Worked with Gp Capt Ockleford Sen Spec in Dental Surgery. Couldn't wait to get away. Youngest son, Tristyn, born there 9 June 1977. Great shock when I visited the site last year, pretty aweful.

cheryl crowther said:

hi im trying to put together a portfolio of all history from nocton hall , blankney hall etc and would love if some one could give me so gripping experiences/ own history this kind of thing reall interests me you can e mail me at chezabelle_88@hotmail.com
thanks x

Dave Boyle said:

A8123386 Gen Tech (E) Dave Boyle

One of my sisters was born at Nocton Hall, another of my sisters had at least one baby delivered there, I was an in & out patient from RAF Church Fenton 80-82, before being posted to RAF Gibraltar in Septmber 82.

Jennifer Bryan-Gowen said:

I am too looking for information about the Guinea Pig Club near SAouth Rauceby? Like Michael Smith (posted March 24th 2010) have only managed to trace to near the WW2 hospital site. If any one could help? With thanks.

Jennifer Bryan-Gowen said:

I am too looking for information about the Guinea Pig Club near SAouth Rauceby? Like Michael Smith (posted March 24th 2010) have only managed to trace to near the WW2 hospital site. If any one could help? With thanks.

Tracey Carino said:

I'm looking for a Geoffrey Whitehead who was from Yorkshire who was in an army hospital in Dorset in 1949ish, this could be a very long shot.

jack gittus said:

I was at Nocton hall from jan 1967-nov 1969 "working" in reception. It was a dream posting for me, brilliant people, the like I have yet to meet. Great memories eg. Theatre group, booze ups in Potterhamworth and Metheringham,winning the hospitals football cup, how I miss those halcyon days. Retired a year now (oap), where has the time gone ??

Christopher James Garton said:

I was Born at nocton in May 1979 and have heard many a fond tail of the staff who brought me into the worl including a very strict officer midwife who had a few words with my poor terrified father who was a mere RAF junior tech. and wouldnt stop apologising for my mothers colourfull poetry! Such a shame the place that started my great journey has ended this way through such mindless ignorance, but this is the world we live in. It is a reassurance though that one place touched and helped so many lives.

Steven Norton said:

I was in Nocton (8yrs old) July 1969 met princess Alexandra! Would be great if any ex staff or patiants have news/pics from that time. I was in with Perthes disease (hips) i look forward to any info

carole nixon ( Bacon) said:

I was at nocton hall 1974 to 1977. Have many happy memories there! Remember Sue Waugh nee Warburton she had a suiski 120 i had a honda 125! Would love to hear of anyone who was at nocton 1974 to 1977 or knows me

Steven Norton said:

Still after info Royal visit July 69 had pics taken (was 8yrs old) never collected anyone with any info can email me @ stevennorton61@googlemail.com would be a great xmas present! Thanks Steve Norton

Alan Clarke said:

First memory of Nocton, medical ward, 12 was it? for Endoscopy under Dr(Wg Cmdr)? 7 ulcers and 5 years on experimental tablets. Final operation under Wg Cmdr King RAF Ely. My 2 sons born at Nocton, it's demise is a disaster and for all the other RAF hostpitals.

Jim Gilmore said:

I was at Nocton Hall 1956-1958. The happiest time of my life. The Skiffle group - the drama group under FO Irvine Christmas 1956 with the wards decorated in spectacular style - ward 5 was the deck of a pirate ship with sheets as sails hung fron the roof. The pantimome "The lincoln Imp" dances, cinema and a beautiful WRAF corporal Milson from the Dental centre who I married after demob. I visited Nocton several times after demob staying with Mr and Mrs Salisbury of the "Works and Bricks" Such a shame to see the ruin.

Stephen Rothery said:

I was born there in 1982, sad to see it in such a sorry state.

Robert Truelove said:

I was born there in 1975 and my sister was born there in 1969. Those pictures bring back some memories!!

Al Netto’s comments in a Nocton Web site, June 10, 2011 regarding the condition of Nocton Hall Hospital. It was sad to see the how badly deteriorated the hospital had gotten after it was abandoned to the elements. I at one time like many that came before me walked those long, long halls. I was sadden by my search for information on Nocton Hall when I found videos of bands playing heavy metal in the wards and people walking around those same halls with the movie cameras documenting tails about ghosts walking the halls.

Only god knows what they and many others did over time. It seem like nature was not the cause of all that damage. They most likely are being exposed to lead, asbestos and all kinds of fungi during those activities and might need of medical care someday. Have some respect for your community. It wasn’t a fancy hospital but it served our countries well during many wars. That hospital had a beautiful building just outside its gates. I never saw the inside of this once stately manor.

The British took good care of us and treated us American GI’s like family. They gave us a lot of things to do when we were off and invited us Yanks to their homes for diner with their families. Being stationed at Nocton Hall during Desert Storm and living at RAF Digby was different but at least we weren’t living in the sand, getting lead poising (shot at) and ducking scud missiles like my friend Ryan Piper who was stationed at Lakenheath and found himself in Saudi Arabia doing just that.

The weather and the IRA was the greatest threat we were warned about. While we were stationed at Nocton, 10 Downing St was bombed by the IRA in a mortar attack from an open top VW bus and there was a huge snow storm that kept me stuck in Mumford near Lakenheath for days.

We traveled by double decked red buses to and from work at hospital and the only injury to hospital staff during the war were from a bus accident on the ice. Out of the 1,000 plus Air Force medical personnel there were about 650 that came from David Grant Medical Center at Travis AFB in Fairfield CA.

I was one of Bioenvironmental Engineering Techs that were there with Tony Llanes, Marie Blake, Maj Headrick and from Environmental Health was Capt Copley, Lisa Halloway and Leslie Arana.

We were given a Quonset hut to work in and were not assigned to the nice sanitary clean and neat hospital building. We walk into the hut in the middle of the night to hear crunch, crunch with every step and it wasn't until we found the light switch did we realize the noise were the bones birds being crushed under our feet.

The hut had all the war time mission equipment ready in place but we didn’t expect all the dead birds, dirt and outright nasty smell. If anyone dropped dead from cleaning the mess then we had all the body bags. Thank God we never had to use any on the wounded being sent to us from theater of operations (8 hour away by Medical Evacuation transport). We ate American chow at Nocton and British meals at RAF Digby, RAF Cranwell and RAF Waddington where most GI’s were billeted.

I remember visiting one marine on the ward that was treated for a sever shrapnel wound to the shoulder and found out he was born in Fairfield CA. I think we had 750 beds and only 35 were ever filled. The war ended quickly and we went home. I think we should have gone all the way to Bagdad and taken out the butcher of Bagdad and we might not have had to go back almost 10 years later.

After 911 we should have sent all those brave men and women to kill Bin laden in his cave and not Iraq to find WMD that didn’t exist after all. It’s been almost 10 years since 3,000 innocent civilians died when the WTC came down, Pentagon and Shanksville’s first civilian soldiers (passengers) did battle in the sky to save untold number on the ground. “Let’s Roll” was the battle cry in stopping a cowardly enemy over the skies Shanksville, PA.

Now the coward that everyone thought was living in a cave and putting his wealth into fighting infidels was living well all along in a Pakistani mansion surrounded by our military allies. Oh well our Navy Seals got him and he’s DEAD. If GOD’s Willing as they say his whole chain of command and control will be given the same chance to get 70 plus virgins in hell.

Al Netto can be reached at albertnetto@gmail

Albert G. Netto said:

Al Netto’s comments in a Nocton Web site, June 10, 2011 regarding the condition of Nocton Hall Hospital. It was sad to see the how badly deteriorated the hospital had gotten after it was abandoned to the elements. I at one time like many that came before me walked those long, long halls. I was sadden by my search for information on Nocton Hall when I found videos of bands playing heavy metal in the wards and people walking around those same halls with the movie cameras documenting tails about ghosts walking the halls.

Only god knows what they and many others did over time. It seem like nature was not the cause of all that damage. They most likely are being exposed to lead, asbestos and all kinds of fungi during those activities and might need of medical care someday. Have some respect for your community. It wasn’t a fancy hospital but it served our countries well during many wars. That hospital had a beautiful building just outside its gates. I never saw the inside of this once stately manor.

The British took good care of us and treated us American GI’s like family. They gave us a lot of things to do when we were off and invited us Yanks to their homes for diner with their families. Being stationed at Nocton Hall during Desert Storm and living at RAF Digby was different but at least we weren’t living in the sand, getting lead poising (shot at) and ducking scud missiles like my friend Ryan Piper who was stationed at Lakenheath and found himself in Saudi Arabia doing just that.

The weather and the IRA was the greatest threat we were warned about. While we were stationed at Nocton, 10 Downing St was bombed by the IRA in a mortar attack from an open top VW bus and there was a huge snow storm that kept me stuck in Mumford near Lakenheath for days.

We traveled by double decked red buses to and from work at hospital and the only injury to hospital staff during the war were from a bus accident on the ice. Out of the 1,000 plus Air Force medical personnel there were about 650 that came from David Grant Medical Center at Travis AFB in Fairfield CA.

I was one of Bioenvironmental Engineering Techs that were there with Tony Llanes, Marie Blake, Maj Headrick and from Environmental Health was Capt Copley, Lisa Halloway and Leslie Arana.

We were given a Quonset hut to work in and were not assigned to the nice sanitary clean and neat hospital building. We walk into the hut in the middle of the night to hear crunch, crunch with every step and it wasn't until we found the light switch did we realize the noise were the bones birds being crushed under our feet.

The hut had all the war time mission equipment ready in place but we didn’t expect all the dead birds, dirt and outright nasty smell. If anyone dropped dead from cleaning the mess then we had all the body bags. Thank God we never had to use any on the wounded being sent to us from theater of operations (8 hour away by Medical Evacuation transport). We ate American chow at Nocton and British meals at RAF Digby, RAF Cranwell and RAF Waddington where most GI’s were billeted.

I remember visiting one marine on the ward that was treated for a sever shrapnel wound to the shoulder and found out he was born in Fairfield CA. I think we had 750 beds and only 35 were ever filled. The war ended quickly and we went home. I think we should have gone all the way to Bagdad and taken out the butcher of Bagdad and we might not have had to go back almost 10 years later.

After 911 we should have sent all those brave men and women to kill Bin laden in his cave and not Iraq to find WMD that didn’t exist after all. It’s been almost 10 years since 3,000 innocent civilians died when the WTC came down, Pentagon and Shanksville’s first civilian soldiers (passengers) did battle in the sky to save untold number on the ground. “Let’s Roll” was the battle cry in stopping a cowardly enemy over the skies Shanksville, PA. Now the coward that everyone thought was living in a cave and putting his wealth into fighting infidels was living well all along in a Pakistani mansion surrounded by our military allies. Oh well our Navy Seals got him and he’s DEAD. If GOD’s Willing as they say his whole chain of command and control will be given the same chance to get 70 plus virgins in hell.
Al Netto can be reached at albertnetto@hotmail

william Garton said:

Does anyone remember Billy Garton,he was the coalman for 20yrs around the camp & he would love to hear from anyone who remembers him because believe me he will remember you,or if you fancy meeting up with an old pal he's in the star & garter every daytime.He'd love to see you.xxx

Phil Collie said:

I was born in the maternity unit at Nocton Hall on 27 Apr 66. Mum is called Maureen, Dad was then Sgt Malcolm Collie in stn workshops at RAF Binbrook (blacksmith/welder). I see RAF Binbrook has been redeveloped as 'Brookenby' - glad to see they kept the old street names - we lived on Lincoln Road.

Sally Lines (nee Dewhurst) said:

Hi to all I was so sorry to see the demise of The hospital at Nocton. I was there in 1970-972 on SEN 28.

I had a fab time although we were worked very hard, only a day and a half off a week and they were not always together! It made me a good nurse (I hope) I remember Margaret, Mandy, Isobel, Chris, Group Captain Evershed was the CO. Happy days!

Stephen barnettd4288274 sac said:

Our first daughter Suzanne Margaret born 31dec 1970. I was stationed@ RAFManby

martin davies said:

hi dont remember nocton hall,
my mum said i was born in the hospital,dad was at scampton,(1961)
Martin Davies

brenda sturdy said:

Hi, does anyone know if I can find the birth records from Nocton Hall.I was born there Nov 8 1957 and would really like to find what time I was born?Registration in Lincolnshire can't help me.

Thanks

Brenda

Tony Gleeson said:

I was Nocton Hall when Princess Alexandra visited i was on ward three and F/S Owen was in charge.Matron was Ducot Amos very friendly and kind person. Cliff
Shepherdson Del Reardon, Tony and Sue Purdy were in our group. Chief technician Connoly was our tutor.
So sad to i see it as it is now. I have good memories of it, Still in touch with Mike Jackson who came from Hull but is now in Dallas. He recently met up with Zena Bloor and Terr Nolan. Would be nice to hear from any one of that time/
Tony Gleeson

peter kay said:

Served here from 73-76 in the Path Lab. Remember Bob Pile, Wing Cmr Montgomerie, Tom Lloyd, Vera Betts, John Griffiths, Fireman Merv, Bob Craigie, Tony Collins, Ollie Holman etc etc and a host of others. Wonderful atmospheric place and wouldn't have missed it for the world. Elder daughter born here July 75. Nearly forgot Trisha and Lynn Hickman.
Regards to all who may remember me.

Elaine mccormack said:

I was born here

Lesley Watson said:

I was born at Nocton Hall on 25th April 1968. My dad Brian Watson was based at RAF Waddington. My mum Thelma is from Lincoln and she remembers the day well. Getting a lift from my Uncle Alan and me nearly being born in the car. I was kept in maternity wing for 6 weeks because of weight loss. A few months later dad was based at RAF Colerne, and we lived in Thickwood. Happy days. My sister was born in 1970.

Mark Acton said:

I was posted to Nocton Hall Hospital late in 1979 and spent three very happy years there in fact my eldest son Jay was born in the maternity unit on the 6th Jan 1981 31 years ago today what a shame to see that the old place has been allowed to fall into such disrepair. I'll always remember Nocton Hall very affectionately.

Joan Pearce nee Watts said:

I was at Nocton Hall from December 1968 to July 1971.
Did my nurse training there. Would love to hear from anyone who was there at the same time and remembers me.
Enjoyed my time there and all the lovely people I met and had fun with.

Karen Thomas (nee Standring) said:

I too was born here on February 1st 1962, my Dad was in the R.A.F but I'm not sure where he was based. I made my entrance at 6.00 am. Would be amazing if any medical staff who worked on maternity at that time were still around to talk about it. I would love to hear from you. I would love to know what life was like back then, and it would be great if anybody knew my parents Ken and Toni Standring.

Aaron Thorpe said:

I wonder if anyone reading this used to live on Habbanya Rise. If so it would be great to see some pictures or hear some stories. I believe the houses on that street were where the Officers lived.

Marcus Beck said:

I was born at Nocton Hall on the 26th July 1962. Father was Donald Beck, based at RAF Coningsby and we were living in Woodhall Spa at the time. He apparently had to get my heavily pregnant Mother to Nocton Hall (on the back of his motorbike) in quite a hurry. I would love to see some photos of Nocton Hall around that time.

Chris Satchwell said:

I was one of the unfortunates who underwent major surgery at this Hospital - I use the word lightly !!
I was operated on for 6+ hrs and came around almost a vegetable not even knowing who my mother was nor indeed who I was. At the time I was 10 years old.During the next 10 years I suffered various relapses, missed a great deal of schooling was put through dozens of tests in mental institutes etc.
My parents asenior officer in the RAF was never told what the cause of my condition was.
The years passed and I gradually recovered from whatever had caused my condition and living in Scotland in 1973 happened to get run over breaking my leg quite badly which again caused me to be hospitalised. When the swelling had gone down in my leg and at the time of my first plaster change I was accompanied by a Theatre Sister who asked about my troubles earlier in my life. She explained that the figures listed for Anesthetic and Oxygen did not add up and that the reason for my earlier condition and years of suffering and frustration was caused by Oxygen starvation during the operation carried out by the Air Force. A long time has passed but what price hands up and compensation.

I hope Nocton Hall no longer exists and that the operating staff who tended me had one hell of a life.

Tonya Glennester said:

hi i was born in the hospital on the 4th on july 1982 at 2.45 am my father Victor Thomas Glennester was an engineer in the r.a.f. i was wondering how many children were born after me as i know the hospital closed shortly after i know of one other girl born after me before the hospital closed.

its devastating to see the state the building is in now.

x

michael vidler said:

hi i was at nocton hall round about 1976-77 was only 6 or 7 years old was there to have gromment but in my ears my dad was in the raf as a fireman, its a shame that nocton hall is in derlict

deborah woodcock (nee McDonald) said:

Hi I was born at Nocton Hall 11th April 1955. My father was an officer at RAF Cranwell at the time. There is no-one on this site born as early as me. I assume as the maternity wing was not built until 1957 that they must have had some where else on site for deliveries.

Carol Ross said:

Hi we were stationed at RAF Cranwell and my son Gary was born at Nocton Hall on 6th February 1982 we then moved to RAF Akrotiri and my second son Alan was born 20th February 1984 the same midwife delivered both my babies does anyone know what her name was.....

leslie stevens said:

I was at Nocton Hall between 1969 and 1971 on sen training course 24. Fantastic time and remember well 'Mandy Murdoch, John Lumb, Still in touch with my old girlfriend Victoria Peake. I visit Lincoln regularly and very sad about the Halls continuing deterioration. Would love to hear from anyone who remembers me.

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Kelvin Philpott said:

I was pleased to read this site as my lovely daughter was born there on 31st May 1965

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This page contains a single entry published on June 3, 2009 10:42 PM.

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